Posts in Educational
The Truth About “People Foods” for Dogs
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Feeding “people food” to dogs has long been a controversial topic. Across the internet, you’ll find a variety of posts telling you which foods are safe, which foods should never be fed to dogs, and which foods are hotly contested. All this information becomes even more confusing when you consider that many dog food companies that produce human-grade, raw dog food are hitting the scene. Are dogs supposed to eat human food or not?!

Everyone is different with their dogs’ behavior standards. While some people are laxer with table scraps, others have more rigid rules about where and when their dogs can eat people food. Whichever way works for you is fine! If you have questions about what human foods you can feed your dog, here are some quick tips:

  • There are a number of human foods that have nutritional value for dogs. Human foods and dog foods aren’t as mutually exclusive as you may have initially thought. Lots of our whole, natural foods provide the same nutrients for dogs as they do for us. As a rule of thumb, processed human foods should not be added to your dog’s diet. Stick to whole nutrition as much as you can.

  • Some foods are absolute no-gos. While a lot of human foods are fine for dogs to eat, they don’t process all foods the same way we do. To that end, there are a handful of foods you should keep away from your dog at all costs. These include chocolate, avocado, grapes, onions, and xylitol. The ASPCA has a helpful list of foods to avoid when it comes to feeding your pup.

  • Snacks should never replace your dog’s regular diet. Never rely too heavily on snacks as dietary supplements for your dog. You should only be giving your dog table scraps on occasion. If you’re concerned or confused about the best treat-giving schedule for your dog, have a conversation with your veterinarian. No matter how healthy your table scraps are, your dog should get the majority of their calories from their dinner.

Human food generally isn’t as bad for dogs as people make it out to be, but it shouldn’t be your dog’s main source of nutrition. Feed your dog treats in moderation! If you want human-grade food that you know will be good for your dog, grab a bag of Pawsitively Pure dog treats. Browse our shop now and bring some home!

How to Introduce a New Dog to Your Family
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Is there anything more exciting than bringing a new dog home? There’s so much to learn and love as you and your new dog become more familiar. As dog owners already know, every dog has its own unique personality, and getting to know a dog is just like getting to know your new best friend! Whether you’re adopting a puppy or an older dog from the shelter, it’ll take some time to get familiar and comfortable around each other, especially if you already have dogs in your family.

Sometimes introductions between dogs are super easy, and other times they’re more fractious. Whichever way you think the introduction may go, it’s important to be prepared so you can make the process as smoothly as possible. Here are a few of our tips to help you make your new dog feel at home: 

  • Make sure you have a partner with you during the first few introductions. Introducing dogs is not a one-man job. Make sure you have a friend with you and that each of you is assigned to one dog. Before you get started, make sure your helper knows your house rules for your dog, and that they should keep a calm demeanor. Your dog responds to your emotions, so it’s important that you set the tone and stay cool.

  • If possible, do the introductions in a neutral space. Dogs are territorial animals. Bringing a new dog into your home before they’re acquainted can spark some aggressive behavior and lead to your dogs not getting along. Don’t go somewhere with a lot of other dogs and stimulation, like a dog park, or there are too many opportunities for distraction.

  • Introduce in short spurts, rather than one large session. It’s important to have other things on hand to keep your dog busy during the introduction. You should begin by letting them touch noses and sniff for a brief few moments, then separate them to do some training work. Continue to pepper in small interactions until the big feelings of excitement have worn off.

With the right preparation, your new dog will be part of your family in no time. It’s all about the way you set the stage for your dogs. To learn more about guiding your dogs through positive interaction, talk with your vet. To get treats for your dog to help things go smoothly, visit our shop today!


School is Back in Session! Fun and Easy Tricks to Teach Your Dog
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We’ve all heard the saying, “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks.” But here at Pawsitively Pure dog food, we believe that any dog can learn a new trick with the right incentive! Soft enough to break into small chunks and packed with the best nutritious ingredients, our human-grade dog treats are the perfect reward for a learning dog. Even our senior boy, Jackson, has learned a few new ones in recent years!

To celebrate the return of the school year, here are a few fun and easy tricks you can teach any dog, no matter what stage of life they’re in: 

  • “Shake Hands” may look like an advanced trick, but it’s one of the easiest there is to teach a dog! Dogs will naturally paw at you if you’re holding something they’re curious about. If you tuck a treat in your closed fist, hold it toward your dog and say the command word, “shake!” When they reach to paw at you, reward them for their response.

  • Many people shy away from teaching their dogs “speak” since they probably already bark enough. However, putting “speak” and “quiet” to commands is one of the easiest ways to combat excessive barking. This one does take a little bit of vigilance, as you’ll need to pay attention to the times when your dog is barking and reward them systematically for following your commands.

  • “Spin” is another great trick for a treat-motivated dog. When you hold a treat right in front of your dog’s nose, they’re likely to follow it. Hold a treat in front of your dog’s nose to guide him in a circle, then repeat the pattern. As your dog gets more familiar with the movement, you may even be able to teach them to “spin left” and “spin right!”

Pawsitively Pure Dog Food’s treats are perfect for training dogs of all ages and sizes. Available in peanut butter & pumpkin and blueberry & oat, our flavors are craveable enough that your dogs will look forward to learning new tricks every day. Send us a message or browse through our shop to learn more!

The Benefits of Hydrotherapy for Your Senior Dog
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If you’ve been keeping up with us on social media, you’ve probably seen a couple videos of our dog Jackson at his hydrotherapy sessions. It’s hard for us to believe that our boy is already 11 years old, and when you see the sparkle in his eye and the pep in his step, it might be hard for you to believe as well! Of course, we attribute a lot of his health and happiness to his human-grade dog food diet, but hydrotherapy plays a huge part in keeping him spry for his age.

Jackson loves his hydrotherapy sessions with Dip’n Dogs Hydrotherapy in Orlando. Hydrotherapy is great exercise for all dogs, especially senior dogs or those recovering from surgery or injuries. Here are just a handful of the big benefits it’ll bring to your pups: 

  • No dog is too big or too small. At Dip’n Dogs and many other hydrotherapy facilities like it, the therapy session takes place in a pool, often assisted by a floatation vest. Dogs of any size are able to hop in and take a lap around the pool or to complete the exercises set out for them by their therapists. Under supervision, they’ll be able to carry out several exercises designed to target their problem points.

  • Swimming has less impact than out-of-water exercises. Joint health is so important for older dogs. Often, the reason why they start to slow down with age is that their joints become stiff and painful. Water therapy offers enough resistance for a dog to get a good workout without jostling or impacting their joints. This is also important for dogs healing from injuries!

  • Water-based activities can easily target any number of joints, muscles, or problem areas. Therapists design their activities based on your dog’s individual needs. By simply tilting your dog to one side or another, they can put the focus on the areas that need it most. Activities like swimming in figure-8’s are very helpful for spine strength and conditioning. Often, therapeutic pools have jets that they can turn on for an additional challenge or more resistance.

We highly recommend hydrotherapy for any senior dog. Even if your dog is young and in great shape, swimming is one of the best ways to help your dog stay active, build critical strengths, and get a good cardiovascular workout in. To learn more about Dip’n Dogs, click here. To browse through our selection of human-grade dog food, treats, and bone broth, click here. 

Summer Safety Tips for You and Your Pups
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We hope you and your dogs have been enjoying a fun and exciting summer! Everyone loves the spring and summer months as they give us a little extra time to get outdoors and have some fun in the sun. Even if you and your furry friends don’t get the opportunity to take a little vacation, there are plenty of dog-friendly locations around Central Florida for you and your pups to play and explore. Orlando Weekly compiled this great list, if you need a few ideas! 

As you enjoy the summer months, there are a few safety precautions you should keep in mind so you and your dogs can have the best time possible. Here are a handful of suggestions to help you have safe fun in the sun: 

  • Take care not to let your dog walk on hot sidewalks or asphalt. Since you’re almost always wearing shoes outside, you probably don’t realize just how hot the pavement can get. Studies show that when the outside temperature hits 86 or 87 degrees, asphalt can clock in at over 130 degrees - and here in Central Florida, we’re regularly seeing temperatures above 90 degrees. Surfaces that hot can easily burn your dog’s feet, causing pain and blistering or worse. As a rule of thumb, if the pavement is too hot for you to leave your hand there for five seconds, it’s too hot for your dog’s paws.

  • Be sure to help your dog stay hydrated, and get familiar with the signs of overheating. Dog’s can’t sweat like we can - they pant and drink water to help regulate their body temperature. When your dog is playing with its friends, it may not be getting the hydration it needs to stay happy. Try to encourage your dog to drink a little bit of water at frequent intervals, rather than a lot all at once. If you notice that your dog has wobbly legs, is drooling a lot, or is vomiting, they may be suffering from overheating and need to see a vet right away. For more information on keeping your dog hydrated, check out our blog here.

  • Your dogs need sunscreen, too! Dogs with shorter hair and lighter colored coats are especially susceptible to sunburn and associated skin cancers that come with it. Make sure you at least apply sunscreen to the areas of your dog where skin is exposed, like nose and bellies. Your vet should be able to recommend a dog-friendly sunscreen formula for your pup. 

Having fun in the sun is quite possible with the right precautions! For more great pet health and safety tips, be sure to follow us on Facebook and Instagram.


3 Reasons Why You Should Microchip Your Dogs
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July! One of the hottest months of the summer. We know it and love it as the month when we spend extra time splashing in the pool, fire up the grill, and head to the beach. It’s also one of the months when we celebrate a holiday with fireworks. Many pet parents have noticed that fireworks seem to start launching earlier and earlier in the season, and as such, they’ve had to calm down their nervous pets for longer. 

For the month of July, we want to focus on the importance of microchipping your pets. Here are 3 reasons why microchipping is not only a good idea - it’s a necessity: 

  1. It could be a lifesaver in times of distress - like during fireworks season. Loud bangs, like thunder and fireworks, are enough to truly frighten a dog. Sometimes, in times of panic, your dog’s first reaction is to bolt, and if they run from your home while they’re not wearing a collar or ID, no one will know who they belong to. Microchips are a built-in identification that will be with your dog at all times and could save their life.

  2. It’s as easy to get as a vaccination. Microchips aren’t as scary as they sound! They are administered to your dog the same way shots are, and don’t require a serious procedure. Often, animal shelters will microchip their animals before they go home with a new family, but it’s always a good idea to check with your vet to make sure your dog is properly identified.

  3. It’s more effective than a collar and tag. Collars and tags are the traditional method of displaying your dog’s identification. But sometimes, especially with older collars or harnesses, they can be torn off or removed. Your dog’s microchip will be with them forever, and as long as you keep your account current, the vet can find your info to contact you if your dog gets out.

Microchipping is a quick and easy way to make sure your dog stays safe and happy, even in troubling events. This July, the month of fireworks, consider microchipping your dog if you haven’t already. We wish you a safe and happy 4th of July!

Keep an Eye out for These Age-Related issues in Your Dog (From Mercola)
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Our chocolate lab, Jackson, just turned 11 this month, officially making him a senior dog. While he stays healthy with his natural food diet and bone broth, we’ve seen that he’s getting a few more aches and pains that he didn’t have when he was a young pup. Of course, everyone experiences new ailments as they age - even humans. But some age-related issues may be more difficult to detect in senior dogs.

Mercola recently published an article titled, “Age-related issues your dog may be hiding” on their Dog Health blog. What may be surprising to you is that many dogs tend to try and remain stoic as they experience some symptoms, making illnesses more difficult for you to detect. This is an instinctive action, as displaying signs of weakness or illness in the wild makes them vulnerable to predators. Even though your dog has been part of your family for years, some old instincts stay around forever.

According to Mercola, the most common age-related health issues you should look for in your dog include joint pain and arthritis, oral health issues, urinary issues, and eye health issues. Again, it can be hard to tell when your dog has an illness as he may be hiding it, but keep an eye on his regular daily behaviors and monitor if anything has changed.

To read the full article, click the link above. To stock up on bone broth to keep your senior dog healthy, browse through our website.

It’s National Pet Preparedness Month
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June marks the start of hurricane here in Florida. While Central Florida has been relatively lucky in avoiding major hurricane damage over the last few years, we know from past experience that pets often get left behind when disaster strikes. That’s why June has been decreed National Pet Preparedness Month, in hopes that animal abandonment in serious emergencies declines thanks to education and preparation.

When you’re getting your home and family ready for the hurricanes, don’t forget to have a plan in place for your dog, as well! Here are three things to keep in mind as you create your emergency preparedness plan for your pets:

  1. Make sure your pets are microchipped. This should be a given in any season, not just during hurricane season! If you haven’t already microchipped your dogs, now is the time. In the event that your dog gets spooked and runs away in the middle of the storm, their microchip will allow whoever finds them to identify you as their owner and return them safely home. It’s also a good idea to give them an ID tag with your name and contact info.

  2. Find a pet-friendly shelter or hotel ahead of time. Your dog is your family - make sure he has a place to stay when you leave your home in the case of an evacuation. Some evacuation shelters don’t accept dogs for safety or other reasons, but leaving your dog behind isn’t an option. Visit www.pet-friendly-hotels.net to find some of the best pet friendly spots in your area, and book in advance if it looks like an evacuation is required.

  3. The buddy system works. Make sure you share your pet’s information with a neighbor, family member, or friend who lives nearby. Doing so will help you ensure that someone will be able to carry out your pet evacuation plan in the unfortunate case that you’re caught outside evacuation lines when the order is issued. You’ll want to give your buddy a copy of your house key, a copy of your evac plan, and detailed notes on where your pet’s necessary supplies are kept.

Hurricanes can make anyone nervous, including your dogs! But helping your pet stay safe and happy during a natural disaster doesn’t have to be difficult when you come prepared. Red Rover has a handy checklist so you can make sure you’ve taken care of the most important pet evacuation tasks before the storm rolls through.

This month, we’re offering 10% off all orders over $50 so you can stock up on food and broth ahead of time. There’s no code required at checkout, so get shopping! Click here to view our current products.


Keeping Your Dog Hydrated this Summer
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It’s already getting pretty hot outside! We love the summer months here in Florida as they give us lots of opportunities to take our dogs to the park or the beach for an afternoon of fun. But when you’re outside for a long time, you probably notice that you’re sweating a lot and need plenty of water to maintain your fluid levels. Even though your dog doesn’t sweat, he or she needs just as much water as you to stay hydrated and happy!

Dehydration in dogs can cause some serious health issues, including lethargy and shock. It can be easy to lose track of time when you’re playing fetch in the hot sun, but make sure you include plenty of water breaks during play time. Here are some tips to help you keep your dog hydrated this summer:

  • Keep a clean water bowl on hand at all times. Cleaning your dog’s bowl daily is a necessity, especially during the summer when they’ll be drinking a lot. Sometimes, when bacteria and other buildup remains in the water bowl, your dog won’t want to drink from it. We like to clean our dogs’ water bowls every morning when we give them fresh water. You can also keep collapsible travel bowls on hand for park and beach visits.

  • Don’t let your dog drink too much water too quickly. Gulping down a lot of water may seem like the right solution to dehydration, but doing so can cause stomach upset and cause your dog to vomit. Vomiting and other stomach upsets can leave your dog even more dehydrated than they were to begin with. It’s best to offer small amounts of water at regular intervals to keep their fluids up.

  • Especially if you’re not home during the day, provide your dog with a bowl that he can’t knock over and is suitable for his face shape. Tall bowls are great for dogs with long ears, like basset hounds, to help prevent ear infections. However, a bowl that’s too tall for a small dog can leave them unable to drink all the way to the bottom. Make sure your active dog has a bowl with a weighted bottom so it can stand up to any roughhousing and play time.

When you give your dog outside time this summer, never leave him or her chained or tied up to a tree or post. Their ties can get wrapped around the post and prevent them from being able to reach their water sources. Always make sure you supervise play time and intersperse rest and water intervals to keep them safe and healthy. To learn more, send us an email today!


Socializing Your Dog the Right Way
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Beyond basic potty training, socializing your dog is one of the most important things you can do for them as a puppy. Proper socialization will give your dog opportunities to play with other dogs, to be calm and cool around new people, and to adapt to new environments without stress or upset. But there’s more to socializing than simply introducing your dog to a situation and letting them do their thing.

Socializing an older dog is more difficult than socializing a puppy, so we recommend you take care of socialization earlier on in your pet’s life. However, sometimes in the case of rescues or extenuating circumstances, you’re unable to take care of these tasks in puppyhood. In any case, making sure your dog is socialized will help reduce fear and aggression, eliminate excitability, and make playtime, walks, and new circumstances more pleasant for both you and your dog. Here are some tips on socializing your dog the right way:

  • Make sure you include lots of things your dog loves, like treats and toys. Socializing is stressful by nature - you’re exposing your dog to common stressors so they can get over them easily! Any time you go out for a socializing mission, bring plenty of your dog’s favorite treats and toys to reward them for positive behavior. Any time they get off track, readjust their behavior and reward them when they respond in the intended way.

  • Don’t be afraid to use a muzzle. Cesar Chavez, who you may know as The Dog Whisperer, has recommended using a muzzle while socializing for the benefit of humans as well as dogs. Your dog can pick up on your emotions and the emotions of humans around him, so by putting other humans at ease, you’re making the environment less stressful.

  • Don’t jump into any situation too quickly. We don’t recommend going into the dog park right off the bat. Instead, take your dog past the dog park a few times, letting them absorb the sights, sounds, and smells. Stay at a distance, working your way up to letting your dog sniff other dogs at the gates. If your dog reacts negatively, regain that distance and work your way back up. Socializing takes time.

As we mentioned before, try your hardest to take care of socialization tasks while your dog is a puppy instead of leaving him stressed out into adulthood. Be patient with your dog and let him feel what he’s feeling. He will set the schedule based on his comfort levels. Want to get your dog the tastiest treats for your socializing trips? Browse through our store today!